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Education

Financial Aid

  • Latinos in Higher Ed.com.The Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities (HACU) was established in 1986 with a founding membership of eighteen institutions. Because of HACU's exemplary leadership on behalf of the nation's youngest and fastest-growing population, the Association rapidly grew in numbers and national impact.
  • Excelencia in Education.LatinosinHigherEd.com is the first Latino professional employment web site designed specifically for the higher education community. It was launched in response to a growing concern about the need to promote career opportunities in higher education for the growing Latino population.
  • National Council of La Raza (NCLR).NCLR traces its origins to the civil rights movement of the 1960s, as well as to previous efforts that preceded World War II, such as those related to early school and housing desegregation. Although Hispanics, especially Mexican Americans and Puerto Ricans, participated in both movements, they did not gain widespread media coverage or national visibility for their efforts. Without such recognition, legislation such as the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964, while creating enormous change in other areas of the country, had relatively little impact on the Hispanic community.

Open source training

  • Latinos in Higher Ed.com.The Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities (HACU) was established in 1986 with a founding membership of eighteen institutions. Because of HACU's exemplary leadership on behalf of the nation's youngest and fastest-growing population, the Association rapidly grew in numbers and national impact.
  • Excelencia in Education.LatinosinHigherEd.com is the first Latino professional employment web site designed specifically for the higher education community. It was launched in response to a growing concern about the need to promote career opportunities in higher education for the growing Latino population.
  • National Council of La Raza (NCLR).NCLR traces its origins to the civil rights movement of the 1960s, as well as to previous efforts that preceded World War II, such as those related to early school and housing desegregation. Although Hispanics, especially Mexican Americans and Puerto Ricans, participated in both movements, they did not gain widespread media coverage or national visibility for their efforts. Without such recognition, legislation such as the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964, while creating enormous change in other areas of the country, had relatively little impact on the Hispanic community.